Sonic Blister(s)

Sonic Blister(s)

To believe what is actual, not being deceived by how it appears. Sure, our frames of perception can be colorful and wide; but if we are gonna make a factual statement about another subject….It’s best to be sure to check the mathematics of your analysis.

Look Twice, Homie!

In the best of passion, we are often arrested in our own thrills. Caught in the rapture of our meaning and forgetful to the other side of the pole. This happens to the best of us. Our voice and more (visibly) our words are devices of construction. We are building a universe by the words we speak and by the intent we set. When having a conversation fueled with passion and dedication, remember to share the ball. If not, conversation becomes a sport and we begin to rectify Shakespeare’s Monologues. Caught up in our own whirlwinds of speech, cutting aimlessly in the air, making all of the scores.

“Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief thetown-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air
too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently;
for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,
the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and begeta temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious
periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to
very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but
inexplicable dumbshows and noise: I would have sucha fellow whipped for o’erdoing Termagant; it
out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it.”
– Hamlet: Act 3, Scene 2

I remember having to remember that monologue in theater class, and it’s always stayed with me. 😀

I could only imagine those on stage back then, would sometimes get caught up in the drama of the moment. Going way too far into their passions, and using their hands and body with too much weight and detail. Which Shakespear was not too fond of. He understood the need of temperance, which would allow a sort of smoothness. He wanted to avoid at all cost, the act of ‘Trying Too Hard’.

Maybe Shakespeare knew, people could see right through the act, and it was determined to sway through the disappointment of overdoing it.

This sets a remarkable parallel to the act of exercising on our madness. We can be thrown into our own passions at quite the cost, and this gives way to Sonic Blisters.

What are Sonic Blisters?

Sound trapped in some kind of emotional cut, and when we feel the cut, we scream. We act on the drama that we experience and are honest to whatever the feeling brings forth. If it’s frustration, it’s frustration. If it’s kindness, it’s kindness. Sometimes we can bleed too far into the outrage and it becomes overwhelmingly too much – but these blisters are controlled through sound.

Looking Twice // Listening Closely.

 

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