What is Sin?

What is Sin?

There’s a lot that’s been said about ‘Sin’. I heard so much about it growing up. Haven’t we all? Sin has the reputation for being that thing that disappoints g-d. Transgression. When you bypass the law in favor of responding to the lusts of your flesh. With this song, I wanted to challenge the typical core beliefs surrounding sin. What makes some things sinful while other things are just tradition?

So much of sin is made up of the things we consider taboo.  A lot of people are afraid of doing what they wanna do because of the punitive punishment that has been attached to their desires. This is most common if you were raised in a strict religious and or dogmatic environment.  I came up with the idea for this song after writing about sin and the power it had on my life for so while as a Christian. I was always curious about sin and the nature of its influence in my life.

This was a teaching moment to me upon my awareness of growth and desire and hopefully, you may find this useful in navigating your life. If you listen at the end of this song, Stanley Wrinkles comes in to deliver an important message. Who is this, Stanley Wrinkles some might ask?

Stanley Wrinkles is a character I came up with back in 2005 not long after Hurricane Katrina took my family to Texas. He’s a preacher that is passionate about Jesus and sharing the message of the truth. Whether prayer, preaching or talking – he’s always passionately sharing in some way or another.

AND NOW THERE’S DESSERT #1!

My Homie Jeremy Garner was the mastermind behind the production of this track! I remember when he first sent this to me and how amazed I was how fast it came together. The rock metal edge really gives this song a kick and really just stands in your face and sends bones down your spine.

Take a listen and please do enjoy and share with me what you think?

Remember – On YouTube is where to find me and Jeremy Garner’s Latest Collaborations!

(This song is the first serving of dessert shared on August Feels Like Wednesday )

 

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A Reason Beyond

A Reason Beyond

When you take action against a cause are you doing it because of a reason beyond? That is to say – do we factor in how we judge something based on the intent? We’re not always given insight before we make impulse judgments. (And before you think you don’t – think about how quickly we make them.) There’s very little rhyme or reason as to why people believe what they do. Therefore, we should already have the understanding of the ridiculous from the jump. Surprises don’t have to come so sudden – keep a bit of worry in your pocket at all times.

I remember I would debate with people on how morality arrived in humanity. People like Ravi Zacharias were my heroes because it made perfect sense to me that Morality came from a code. This code had an origin and this origin was from God. I had the *unfounded* belief that people couldn’t just be good. They had to have a REASON!

Ironically, I never did things just to be rewarded by some system that favored my goodness. However, I knew and know a lot of people who think that way. Who think – the only reason why their sane is because of a code they MUST follow. If it wasn’t for the moral code, they’d do what they really want to do. I find this framework somewhat terrifying because codes like plans change. When they change you either adapt or act out against normality.

We don’t always have a reason other than ‘Just Cuz’. This isn’t always sufficient for establishing the ground of our processing ability. For instance, if you’re engulfed in a debate and your argument rests on “cuz I said so’ that’s a fallacy. Now if you say ‘It is what it is’ people get pissed. There isn’t anything really wrong with that statement and I probably say it more often than not. It just is cuz things beyond my reason to understand it make it so. Doesn’t mean that I don’t have anything else to say but I accept things are the way the rock n roll of cause and effect.

Mental Hopscotch can be exhausting when the rules are based on who agrees or who doesn’t. The pressing reason to exist is sometimes enough. Owing autonomy to someone else is really the best you can. This is where respect comes in regardless of your reason. Respecting people in the perception that you consider and have empathy for any human being. Respecting their agency. This should be freely given to everybody. Now asking somebody to submit to your authority or the law – that’s the kind of stuff that is earned.

How can we make a difference in this world if we are so set against each other? At some point we’re gonna have to look each other and face what’s looking back at us. There’s no reason to be afraid. To make rash judgments and be guided by our biases. Some of us ain’t playing this fairly while others. Life is much like driving – you don’t just drive for yourself. They’re other people in the road and some of them didn’t learn the same way or even at all. Despite this, we don’t have to subject to nonsense. There’s a rapid disease spreading currently which exists to dethrone facts.

“In school, rarely do we learn how data become facts, how facts become knowledge and how knowledge becomes wisdom.”
– Neil Degrasse Tyson

Everything always goes back to school. What we learning, what we ain’t. Our whole life gives us a chance to correct backward thinking. No one is safe when knowledge is available to us all. Anyone is capable regardless of where you fit on the spectrum.

There’s a reason beyond that can be found within our memories. Just where we would be without our memories? If memories suddenly vanished from our brains we would repeat the same actions over and over again. You learn based on what has happened and you make the decision to act better to avoid whatever may come against you.

What I’m saying ain’t really new from before..*Back to your regularly scheduled program.*

Yep, we all got programs and we turn off the ones our wires don’t respond to. It’s all connected and at the same time, it ain’t. It means whatever you want it to mean. Which is a lot or a little or simply nothing at all.

The New Rebel

“But the new rebel is a skeptic, and will not entirely trust anything. He has no loyalty; therefore he can never be really a revolutionist. And the fact that he doubts everything really gets in his way when he wants to denounce anything. For all denunciation implies a moral doctrine of some kind; and the modern revolutionist doubts not only the institution he denounces, but the doctrine by which he denounces it. . . . As a politician, he will cry out that war is a waste of life, and then, as a philosopher, that all life is waste of time. A Russian pessimist will denounce a policeman for killing a peasant, and then prove by the highest philosophical principles that the peasant ought to have killed himself. . . . The man of this school goes first to a political meeting, where he complains that savages are treated as if they were beasts; then he takes his hat and umbrella and goes on to a scientific meeting, where he proves that they practically are beasts. In short, the modern revolutionist, being an infinite skeptic, is always engaged in undermining his own mines. In his book on politics he attacks men for trampling on morality; in his book on ethics he attacks morality for trampling on men. Therefore the modern man in revolt has become practically useless for all purposes of revolt. By rebelling against everything he has lost his right to rebel against anything.”